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Veterinary Pathology

  • Fatal Septicemia Caused by the Zoonotic Bacterium Streptococcus iniae During an Outbreak in Caribbean Reef Fish 18 agosto 2014
    Keirstead, N. D., Brake, J. W., Griffin, M. J., Halliday-Simmonds, I., Thrall, M. A., Soto, E.
    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings included diffuse fibrinous pericarditis, pale friable livers, and serosal petechiation. Cytological and histological analysis revealed granulocytic and granulomatous inflammation with abundant coccoid bacterial organisms forming long chains. Necrosis, inflammation, and vasculitis were most severe in the pericardium, meninges, liver, kidneys, and gills. Bacterial isolates revealed β-hemolytic, Gram-positive coccoid bacteria identified as S. iniae by amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Results from biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility analysis, together with repetitive element palindromic polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, suggest that a single strain was responsible for the outbreak. The inciting cause for this S. iniae–associated cluster of mortalities is unknown.
  • Book Review: Toxicologic Pathology: Nonclinical Safety Assessment 18 agosto 2014
    Ward, J. M.
  • Paraparesis in a Golden Retriever 18 agosto 2014
    Aschenbroich, S., Woolcock, A., Rissi, D. R.
    A 7-year-old female spayed Golden Retriever dog presented with fever and a 10-day history of neurological signs, including ambulatory paraparesis and pelvic limb ataxia. Neurological examination initially revealed a T3-L3 myelopathy. Thoracic radiographs revealed a diffuse miliary pulmonary pattern. Endotracheal washes and fine-needle aspirates from several organs aimed at identifying a potential infectious agent or neoplastic process were all unsuccessful. Due to worsening of the clinical signs, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy findings included multifocal, pale to dark red, firm nodules infiltrating the lungs, heart, mesentery, pancreas, small intestine, brain, and spinal cord. Cytological examination of impression smears obtained from the pulmonary nodules during necropsy revealed clusters of epithelioid cells admixed with fewer spindle cells, erythrocytes, and scattered leukocytes. Clinical signs and cytological findings initially suggested the possibility of a widespread granulomatous disease or a metastatic epithelial neoplasm as possible clinical differentials in this case. The final diagnosis was based on the gross and histological findings, with confirmation following histochemistry and immunohistochemistry.
  • Editorial 18 agosto 2014
    Newman, S. J.
  • Degenerative Joint Disease: In the Beginning … 18 agosto 2014
    Weisbrode, S. E.
  • Bile Duct Lesions Associated With Turnip (Brassica rapa) Photosensitization Compared With Those Due to Sporidesmin Toxicosis in Dairy Cows 18 agosto 2014
    Collett, M. G.
    Cattle grazing turnips or other brassica forage crops occasionally develop hepatogenous photosensitization. In New Zealand, cases of bovine photosensitization associated with such crops frequently occur during late summer and fall, and this coincides with the facial eczema (sporidesmin toxicosis) "season." Clinical chemistry findings in acute photosensitization cases associated with both brassica and facial eczema include marked serum elevations in -glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities. Distinctive bile duct lesions of "subacute" turnip photosensitization in 2 cows, comprising microscopic cholangiectasis with concentric periductal fibrosis of small bile ducts, and a spectrum of changes from bile duct necrosis progressing to obliterative sclerosis are described. These bile duct lesions are compared with those in 3 cases of "subacute" facial eczema in adult cows, where medium-sized and larger ducts tend to be involved and bile duct hyperplasia and portal fibrosis are more prominent, often leading to bridging between neighboring portal triads.
  • Progesterone Receptor Isoform Analysis by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Canine Mammary Dysplasias and Tumors 18 agosto 2014
    Guil-Luna, S., Stenvang, J., Brunner, N., Sanchez-Cespedes, R., Millan, Y., Gomez-Laguna, J., Mulas, J. M. d. l.
    Cloning and sequencing of the progesterone receptor gene in dogs have revealed 2 isoforms, A and B, transcribed from a single gene. Distribution of isoforms A and B in canine mammary lesions has hitherto been investigated only by Western blot analysis. This study analyzed progesterone receptor and its isoforms in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from canine mammary lesions (4 dysplasias, 10 benign tumors, and 46 carcinomas) using 1-step SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Progesterone receptor was expressed in 75% of dysplasias, all benign tumors, and 59% of carcinomas. Carcinomas, and particularly simple epithelial-type carcinomas, displayed the lowest levels of expression. A high rate of agreement was recorded between RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical labeling. Isoforms A and B were successfully amplified, with correlation coefficients of 0.99 and amplification efficiencies close to 2, and were expressed in all lesion types analyzed. Predominance of A over B expression was observed in carcinomas and complex adenomas. Low-grade tumors exhibited higher progesterone receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, but no difference was observed in the expression of isoform A versus B. Analysis of progesterone receptor mRNA isoforms by RT-qPCR was successful in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples and enabled the distribution of isoforms A and B to be identified for the first time in dysplasias, benign tumors, and malignant tumors of the canine mammary gland. These findings will facilitate future research into the role of progesterone receptor isoforms in the progression of canine mammary tumors.
  • Leukoencephalomyelopathy of Mature Captive Cheetahs and Other Large Felids: A Novel Neurodegenerative Disease That Came and Went? 18 agosto 2014
    Brower, A. I., Munson, L., Radcliffe, R. W., Citino, S. B., Lackey, L. B., Van Winkle, T. J., Stalis, I., Terio, K. A., Summers, B. A., de Lahunta, A.
    A novel leukoencephalomyelopathy was identified in 73 mature male and female large captive felids between 1994 and 2005. While the majority of identified cases occurred in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), the disease was also found in members of 2 other subfamilies of Felidae: 1 generic tiger (Panthera tigris) and 2 Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi). The median age at time of death was 12 years, and all but 1 cheetah were housed in the United States. Characteristic clinical history included progressive loss of vision leading to blindness, disorientation, and/or difficulty eating. Neurologic deficits progressed at a variable rate over days to years. Mild to severe bilateral degenerative lesions were present in the cerebral white matter and variably and to a lesser degree in the white matter of the brain stem and spinal cord. Astrocytosis and swelling of myelin sheaths progressed to total white matter degeneration and cavitation. Large, bizarre reactive astrocytes are a consistent histopathologic feature of this condition. The cause of the severe white matter degeneration in these captive felids remains unknown; the lesions were not typical of any known neurotoxicoses, direct effects of or reactions to infectious diseases, or nutritional deficiencies. Leukoencephalomyelopathy was identified in 70 cheetahs, 1 tiger, and 2 panthers over an 11-year period, and to our knowledge, cases have ceased without planned intervention. Given what is known about the epidemiology of the disease and morphology of the lesions, an environmental or husbandry-associated source of neurotoxicity is suspected.
  • Pathology of Articular Cartilage and Synovial Membrane From Elbow Joints With and Without Degenerative Joint Disease in Domestic Cats 18 agosto 2014
    Freire, M., Meuten, D., Lascelles, D.
    The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia. Macroscopic evidence of degenerative joint disease was found in 22 of 30 cats (39 elbow joints) (73.33% cats; 65% elbow joints), and macroscopic cartilage erosion ranged from mild fibrillation to complete ulceration of the hyaline cartilage with exposure of the subchondral bone. Distribution of the lesions in the cartilage indicated the presence of medial compartment joint disease (most severe lesions located in the medial coronoid process of the ulna and medial humeral epicondyle). Synovitis scores were mild overall and correlated only weakly with macroscopic cartilage damage. Intra-articular osteochondral fragments either free or attached to the synovium were found in 10 joints. Macroscopic or histologic evidence of a fragmented coronoid process was not found even in those cases with intra-articular osteochondral fragments. Lesions observed in these animals are most consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis secondary to degenerative joint disease. The pathogenesis for the medial compartmentalization of these lesions has not been established, but a fragmented medial coronoid process or osteochondritis dissecans does not appear to play a role.
  • Mycobacterium microti Tuberculosis in Its Maintenance Host, the Field Vole (Microtus agrestis): Characterization of the Disease and Possible Routes of Transmission 18 agosto 2014
    Kipar, A., Burthe, S. J., Hetzel, U., Rokia, M. A., Telfer, S., Lambin, X., Birtles, R. J., Begon, M., Bennett, M.
    The field vole (Microtus agrestis) is a known maintenance host of Mycobacterium microti. Previous studies have shown that infected animals develop tuberculosis. However, the disease is also known in cats and is sporadically reported from humans and other mammalian species. We examined trapped field voles from an endemic area, using a range of diagnostic approaches. These confirmed that a combination of gross and histological examination with culture is most appropriate to identify the true prevalence of the disease, which was shown to be more than 13% at times when older animals that have previously been shown to be more likely to develop the disease dominate the population. The thorough pathological examination of diseased animals showed that voles generally develop systemic disease with most frequent involvement of spleen and liver, followed by skin, lymph nodes, and lungs. The morphology of the lesions was consistent with active disease, and their distribution suggested skin wounds or oral and/or aerogenic infection as the main portal of entry. The demonstration of mycobacteria in open skin lesions, airways, and salivary glands indicated bacterial shedding from the skin and with sputum and saliva. This suggests not only the environment but also direct contact and devouring as likely sources of infection.



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